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Articles on Software Development

I used to be a prolific writer for C/C++ Users Journal, Dr. Dobbs Journal, and others, writing mostly about C++, the STL, generic programming, and multithreading (see my list of publications). When it comes to writing about software development, the days of ink and paper are definitely over, and I don't think anybody is missing them. I currently have four articles on software development online, three about C++ and one about JavaScript:
On the Tension between Object-Oriented Programming and Generic Programming, and What Type Erasure Can Do about It
This is a peer-reviewed article published by The C++ Source.
C++ Rvalue References Explained
This article is self-published and has not been peer-reviewed in the traditional sense. However, it has been #1 in Google and Bing searches for “C++ rvalue references” and similar search terms since 2011.
C++ auto and decltype Explained
Some of the people who read my article on C++ rvalue references (see above) have asked me to explain other features of C++11 as well. This is not something that I want to do systematically and comprehensively, because I lack the time to do so. However, I found the subject of C++ auto and decltype interesting enough to write about it. The article is self-published and has not been peer-reviewed in the traditional sense. However, it has been at or near the top in Google and Bing searches for “C++ auto and decltype”, “C++ auto”, and “C++ decltype” since shortly after its publication in the fall of 2013.
Object-Oriented Programming in JavaScript Explained
Object-oriented programming traditionally relies on classes and their instantiations. JavaScript supports object-oriented programming, but it does so by means of constructor functions and prototypes rather than classes. The purpose of this tutorial is to explain the JavaScript way of supporting OOP to people who are accustomed to the traditional class-based style.